Gregor Mendel is my Hero

Hi, I'm Breck, 17, Giant Dork

antikythera-astronomy:

Convective patterns visible on the Sun

antikythera-astronomy:

Convective patterns visible on the Sun

(via fuckyeah-stars)

humanoidhistory:

Spiral galaxy NGC 6744, nearly 175,000 light years across and 30 million light years away. Image from Don Goldman. (NASA)

humanoidhistory:

Spiral galaxy NGC 6744, nearly 175,000 light years across and 30 million light years away. Image from Don Goldman. (NASA)

(via shychemist)

ri-science:

One of the first ever drawings of a fuel cell (1842)

Sir William Robert Grove, judge & physicist, was the father of the modern fuel cell. He developed his idea through experimenting with sending an electric current through water splitting it into its component parts of hydrogen and oxygen. He then tried to reverse the process and combine hydrogen with oxygen to produce electricity and water thereby producing a simple fuel cell.

In this letter from the Ri’s archive, Grove writes to Michael Faraday in October 1842 to describe his new accomplishment:

I have just completed a curious voltaic pile which I think you would like to see, it is composed of alternate tubes of oxygen and hydrogen through each of which passes platina foil so as to dip into separate vessels of water acidulated with sulphuric acid the liquid just touching the extremities of the foil as in the rough figure below…………………….

……………. I cannot but regard the experiment as an important one both as to the chemical and other theories of the pile & as to the catalytic effect of the combination of the gases by platina.

The modern fuel cell is used to power anything from cars, buses, boats and submarines to providing back up power to hospitals, houses and inaccessible areas.

(via wearemadeofstarstuff479)

heythereuniverse:

Diatoms | Jo Angell Design

sci-universe:

Neil’s words from the last episode of “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey”

(via wearemadeofstarstuff479)

bombmagazine:

Gabriel Orozco, Samurai Tree (Invariant Blue), 2005. Acrylic on linen canvas.
"I try to make language confront reality, the reality of the street and what goes on there."

bombmagazine:

Gabriel Orozco, Samurai Tree (Invariant Blue), 2005. Acrylic on linen canvas.

"I try to make language confront reality, the reality of the street and what goes on there."

(via museumoflatinamericanart)

distant-traveller:

Rings around the Ring nebula

It is a familiar sight to sky enthusiasts with even a small telescope. There is much more to the Ring Nebula (M57), however, than can be seen through a small telescope. The easily visible central ring is about one light-year across, but this remarkably deep exposure - a collaborative effort combining data from three different large telescopes - explores the looping filaments of glowing gas extending much farther from the nebula’s central star. This remarkable composite image includes narrowband hydrogen image, visible light emission, and infrared light emission. Of course, in this well-studied example of a planetary nebula, the glowing material does not come from planets. Instead, the gaseous shroud represents outer layers expelled from a dying, sun-like star. The Ring Nebula is about 2,000 light-years away toward the musical constellation Lyra.

Image credit: Hubble, Large Binocular Telescope, Subaru Telescope; Composition & Copyright: Robert Gendler

distant-traveller:

Rings around the Ring nebula

It is a familiar sight to sky enthusiasts with even a small telescope. There is much more to the Ring Nebula (M57), however, than can be seen through a small telescope. The easily visible central ring is about one light-year across, but this remarkably deep exposure - a collaborative effort combining data from three different large telescopes - explores the looping filaments of glowing gas extending much farther from the nebula’s central star. This remarkable composite image includes narrowband hydrogen image, visible light emission, and infrared light emission. Of course, in this well-studied example of a planetary nebula, the glowing material does not come from planets. Instead, the gaseous shroud represents outer layers expelled from a dying, sun-like star. The Ring Nebula is about 2,000 light-years away toward the musical constellation Lyra.

Image credit: Hubble, Large Binocular Telescope, Subaru Telescope; Composition & Copyright: Robert Gendler

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)

hyacynthus:

Leioheterodon madagascariensis eating an egg (X)

hyacynthus:

Leioheterodon madagascariensis eating an egg (X)

spaceexp:

IC1101 Biggest known galaxy in the universe

spaceexp:

IC1101 Biggest known galaxy in the universe

(via gravitationalbeauty)

astronomicalwonders:

The Head of the Seagull Nebula
"This image from ESO’s La Silla Observatory shows part of a stellar nursery nicknamed the Seagull Nebula. This cloud of gas, known as Sh 2-292, RCW 2 and Gum 1, seems to form the head of the seagull and glows brightly due to the energetic radiation from a very hot young star lurking at its heart. The detailed view was produced by the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope."
Credit: ESO

astronomicalwonders:

The Head of the Seagull Nebula

"This image from ESO’s La Silla Observatory shows part of a stellar nursery nicknamed the Seagull Nebula. This cloud of gas, known as Sh 2-292, RCW 2 and Gum 1, seems to form the head of the seagull and glows brightly due to the energetic radiation from a very hot young star lurking at its heart. The detailed view was produced by the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope."

Credit: ESO

(via gravitationalbeauty)

jtotheizzoe:

Hubble Goes Deep
Do not adjust your screen. Before you stands a portal connecting us to the universe as it was just a few hundred million years after The Big Bang.
NASA has released an updated version of the iconic Hubble Deep Field for 2014, adding in data from Hubble’s ultraviolet sensors to bring the total number of galaxies visible in the image to nearly 10,000. And all this in an area just one thirteen-millionth of the entire sky.
Read more about this new Hubble Deep Field image at Bad Astronomy. Check out Hubble’s previous long-exposure views here and here.
And if you want to view the super-duper-extra-large version of this image (which I know you do), click thee here.
We may be specks upon specks among infinitely more candy-like specks, but we are specks who can time travel. And all without leaving the house! I’d say we’re doing pretty well.

jtotheizzoe:

Hubble Goes Deep

Do not adjust your screen. Before you stands a portal connecting us to the universe as it was just a few hundred million years after The Big Bang.

NASA has released an updated version of the iconic Hubble Deep Field for 2014, adding in data from Hubble’s ultraviolet sensors to bring the total number of galaxies visible in the image to nearly 10,000. And all this in an area just one thirteen-millionth of the entire sky.

Read more about this new Hubble Deep Field image at Bad Astronomy. Check out Hubble’s previous long-exposure views here and here.

And if you want to view the super-duper-extra-large version of this image (which I know you do), click thee here.

We may be specks upon specks among infinitely more candy-like specks, but we are specks who can time travel. And all without leaving the house! I’d say we’re doing pretty well.

(via gravitationalbeauty)

libutron:

Crimson topaz - Topaza pella - Postage stamp from Brazil (1996)
 Artist: Etienne Demonte
Photo credit: ©Bernard Kirschner (2011)

libutron:

Crimson topaz - Topaza pellaPostage stamp from Brazil (1996)

 Artist: Etienne Demonte

Photo credit: ©Bernard Kirschner (2011)

omgthatdress:

Lucy Liu can never do anything wrong.

omgthatdress:

Lucy Liu can never do anything wrong.

wapiti3:

Wild Mushrooms on Flickr.
photo by Jean-Luc Elias

wapiti3:

Wild Mushrooms on Flickr.

photo by Jean-Luc Elias

(via absurdiverum)